The monopoly board with today's house prices

Published 11th of December, 2020

Picture credit @SuzyHazelwood

Nothing says Christmas like a board game and for many Monopoly is the ultimate game of boards. But the house prices date back to 1936, so we thought it time to update the board for current house and property prices. This year it will also be difficult for all of us to be in the same room as our loved ones to play a board game so we thought we'd update the house prices and turn this into a quiz you can play over the phone or zoom. So why not challenge your friends and family to our 'what are the average house prices on the monopoly board today?' quiz.

The UK edition of monopoly was launched shortly after the Parker brothers sent a copy of the US version to Waddingtons in 1935. Victor Watson (the MD of Waddingtons) and his secretary travelled from Waddingtons HQ in Leeds to London to choose what are now the iconic locations fr the UK version of the monopoly board.

Not surprisingly, prices for every location on the board have increased, but which has increased the most? Either you will be surprised when you find out or you will be sitting back knowing that you are a very canny property investor.

Whitechapel Road

Whitechapel Road (E1) is located in Tower Hamlets in the East End of London. It is part of a historic Roman Road (now the A11) which connects London to Colchester.

Bonus fact: Whitechapel Road takes its name from a Chapel of ease (a church building other than the parish church built within the parish for ease of access for those not living close the parish church) dedicated to St Mary.

The original monopoly board price was £60, but what does the average house on Whitechapel Road cost today?

A - £400,000

B - £500,000

C - £600,000

Old Kent Road

The Old Kent Road (SE15) is located in Southwark, South East London. It is another London Road which can trace its roots back to Roman times and is now part of the A2 which links London to Dover and was part of the route for Christan pilgrims in the middle ages as chronicled in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

Bonus fact: Old Kent Road is the only property located south of the River Thames on the monopoly board.

The original monopoly board price was £60, but what does the average house on the Old Kent Road cost today?

A - £200,000

B - £300,000

C - £400,000

The Angel Islington

The Angel Islington (N1) is located in north London and is very close to Angel Tube which is served by the Northern Line and has the longest escalators on the London Underground with a rise of 90 feet (27m) and a length of 200 feet (61m).

Bonus fact: The Angel, Islington is not a road at all, but refers to a series of buildings at the corner of Islington High Street and Pentonville Road in Islington. Legend has it that it is included on the monopoly board because Victor Watson (the MD of Waddingtons games decided to include the property on the board whilst taking tea in The Angel Islington Cafe, a plaque is displayed in the building (now a bank) to this day. The Angel Islington is the only site on the board named after a building (excluding stations and electricity and water companies!)

The original monopoly board price was £100, but what does the average house near Angel Islington cost today?

A - £575,000

B - £700,000

C - £825,000

Euston Road

Euston Road is located in central London and runs from King's Cross to Marylebone Road, it is part of the London Inner Ring Road and is a boundary marker for the original London congestion charge zone. It is now part of the A501

Bonus Fact: Euston Road passes six London Underground Tube stations - Regent's Park, Great Portland Street, Warren Street, Euston Square, Euston and Kings's Cross St Pancras

The original monopoly board price was £100, but what does the average house on Euston Road cost today?

A - £750,000

B - £850,000

C - £950,000

Pentonville Road

Pentonville Road is located in central London and runs from Kings Cross to City Road at The Angel Islington. It is linked to Euston Road and like Euston Road also forms part of the original London congestion charge zone boundary.

Bonus fact: The poet John Betjeman's parents ran a cabinet-making business at No. 34–42 Pentonville Road. It was established since 1859 and produced the Tantalus drinks cabinet in 1881.

The original monopoly board price was £120, but what does the average house on Pentonville Road cost today?

A - £650,000

B - £800,000

C - £950,000

Pall Mall

Pall Mall (SW1) is a street in the St James's area of the City of Westminster, connecting St James's Street to Trafalgar Square. Today it also forms part of the A4. Pall Mall is a well-known location for members only clubs including The Reform, the Anthenaeum, Travellers Clubs, Royal Automobile Club and the Institute of Directors.

Bonus fact: Pall Mall is about 0.4 miles in length

The original monopoly board price was £140, but what does the average house on Pall Mall cost today?

A - £1,650,000

B - £1,800,000

C - £1,950,000

Whitehall

Whitehall is probably better known as an area of London associated with the offices, departments and corridors of power of the UK Government than for being a road. As a road, it is the main route from Trafalgar Square to Parliament Square and houses many UK GOvernment departments including the Ministry of Defence and the Cabinet Office. Whitehall is also home to the UK's most famous war memorial, the Cenotaph. The most famous side street branching off of Whitehall is probably Downing Street, where the UK Prime Minister resides at no 10.

Bonus fact: Whitehall was named after the Palace of Whitehall which was the home of all the Kings of England between Henry VIII to William III, before its destruction in 1698. The term Whitehall dates back to the Tudor period and refers to either a festival building or one made from light stone.

The original monopoly board price was £140, but what does the average house on Whitehall cost today?

A - £900,000

B - £1,050,000

C - £1,200,000

Northumberland Avenue

Northumberland Avenue is located in the CIty of Westminster and runs from Trafalgar Square to the Thames Embankment. It was built on the site and takes its name from Northumberland House the home of the Percy family, the Duke of Northumberland between 1874 and 1876.

Bonus fact: The Sherlock Holmes pub on Northumberland Avenue was originally called The Northumberland Arms. It changed its name in 1957 to celebrate the references made to Northumberland Avenue in Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes novels such as The Greek Interpreter and The Hound of the Baskervilles.

The original monopoly board price was £160, but what is the average house price on Northumberland Avenue today?

A - £1,200,000

B - £1,350,000

C - £1,500,000

Bow Street

Bow Street is a road in Covent Garden connecting Long Acre, Russell Street and Wellington Street. Originally developed as a residential street its reputation was somewhat sullied after the opening of the Royal Opera House and the Covent Garden Theatre where it became known as a red light area. However, its most famous association is with the Bow Street Runners the voluntary police force established by Henry Fielding in 1750.

Bonus Fact: Famous former residents of Bow Street include Oliver Cromwell and Robert Harley the 1st Earl of Oxford.

The original monopoly board price was £180, but what is the average house price on Bow Street today?

A - £1,400,000

B - £1,550,000

C - £1,700,000

Marlborough Street

Marlborough Street is a street in Soho, London. It was named after John Churchill, the 1st Duke of Marlborough. It has had a strong association with the law since the late 18th Century

Bonus fact: This monopoly square was actually named after Malborough Street Magistrates Court. There is no Marlborough Street, the road is actually called Great Marlborough Street. The artistic licence on the name was for all the orange properties to have a law and order theme: Bow Street (Bow Street Runners), Marlborough Street (Malborough Street Magistrates Court) and Vine Street (named after Vine Street police station).

The original monopoly board price was £180, but what is the average house price on Great Marlborough Street today?

A - £2,600,000

B - £2,800,000

C - £3,000,000

Vine Street

Vine Street is located in Westminster, London. From the 18th to 20th century it was home to Vine Street Police Station, which became one of the busiest police stations in the world. The street was named after the 18th Century public house - The Vine.

Bonus fact: At just 70 feet in length (21m) following its truncation to make way for the building of Regent Street, Vine Street is the shortest street on the monopoly board, without even room for a pub. Most monopoly board pub crawl routes suggest a refreshment stop on the connecting. aptly named Swallow Street.

The original monopoly board price was £200, but what is the average house price on Vine Street today?

A - £1,300,000

B - £1,600,000

C - £1,900,000

Strand

The Strand runs from Trafalgar Square to Temple Bar, where it becomes Fleet Street inside the City of London. Its name is derived from the Old English 'Strond' which means 'the edge of a river'. The Strand originally ran alongside the north bank of the River Thames.

Bonus fact: The Strand is the subject of a famous music hall song 'Let's all go down the strand'. The chorus of 'Let's all go down the Strand - have a banana' is now recognised and regularly parodied as a stereotypical per of cockney music.

The original monopoly board price was £220, but what is the average house price on the Strand today?

A - £1,200,000

B - £1,450,000

C - £1,700,000

Fleet Street

Fleet Street in the City of London was named after the River Fleet which runs from Hampstead to the River Thames. Synonymous with the press, publishing started in Fleet Street around 1500 when William Caxton's apprentice set up a printing business near Shoe Lane. Although in the modern era many newspapers have relocated away from Fleet Street, in its heyday it was home to many daily newspapers including The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Express, The Times and The Sun

Bonus fact: In 1702 the first of London's daily newspapers the Dialy Courant was published in Fleet Street.

The original monopoly board price was £220, but what is the average house price on Fleet Street today?

A - £800,000

B - £1,000,000

C - £1,200,000

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the heart of central London and is famous for its lions, its fountains and Nelson's column.

Bonus fact: In 1838 the Nelson Memorial Committee approached the UK Government to propose a monument to the victory of Trafalgar. Architect William Railton won a competition to design the memorial, he proposed a 218 foot 3 inch (66.5m) Corinthian column topped with a statue of Lord Nelson. The design was approved but received a widespread objection from the public. The final design had its height reduced to 145 feet 3 inches (44.3m).

The original monopoly board price was £240, but what is the average house price on Trafalgar Square today?

A - £1,050,000

B - £1,200,000

C - £1,350,000

Leicester Square

Leicester Square is a pedestrianised square in the hear of London's West End. It has been known as an entertainment venue since the Great Exhibition of 1851 where it showcased Wylds Great Globe )a 60-foot high globe built by distinguished mapmaker James Wyld. It is famous today for film premiers with many of the UK's largest cinema companies having flagship cinemas situated on the square.

Bonus fact: The main electrical substation for the West End is beneath the Square, its cables run underground from Leicester Square to Plough lane in Wimbledon.

The original monopoly board price was £260, but what is the average house price on Leicester Square today?

A - £1,300,000

B - £1,450,000

C - £1,600,000

Coventry Street

Coventry Street is in the West End of London and connects Leicester Square to Piccadilly Circus and forms part of the A4. It was constructed in 1681 for entertainment and retail purposes and is named after Henry Coventry the secretary of state to King Charles II.

Bonus fact: The Cafe de Paris has been part of Coventry Street since 1924

The original monopoly board price was £260, but what is the average house price on Coventry Street today?

A - £1,450,000

B - £1,650,000

C - £1,850,000

Piccadilly

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster London. It is part of the A4 which connects central London to Hammersmith the M4 and Heathrow Airport. Robert The land was acquired by Robert Baker around 1611 or 1612 and he prospered by making and selling Piccadills, hence the name Piccadilly.

Bonus fact: Piccadilly is the third of the yellow properties on the UK monopoly board, the theme of the yellow properties is that one would see a show in Leicester Square, dine in one of the many restaurants in Coventry Street and then sleep in one of the many luxurious hotels on Piccadilly.

The original monopoly board price was £280, but what is the average house price on Piccadilly today?

A - £3,750,000

B - £4,000,000

C - £4,250,000

Regent Street

Regent Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London and is named after George, the Prince Regent. The street's layout was completed in 1825 and is an early example of English town planning, replacing and truncating other roads such a Vine Street. The street is known for its flagship retail stores such as Hamleys, Liberty and more recently the Apple Store.

Bonus fact: There have been Christmas lights on Regent Street in various forms since 1882.

The original monopoly board price was £300, but what is the average house price on Regent Street today?

A - £1,600,000

B - £1,800,000

C - £2,000,000

Oxford Street

In pre-COVID times, Oxford Street was Europe's busiest shopping street with around half a million visitors a day to its near 300 shops. Oxford Street was originally part of the Via Trinobantina, a Roman road running between Essex and Hampshire and became notorious for public hangings.

Whilst the battle between physical and digital retailers plays out Oxford Street remains an attractive location for retailers flagship stores and these continue to attract millions of shoppers each year.

Bonus fact: The Tottenham is a Grade II listed pub located at 6 Oxford Street, it was built in the mid 19th century and is the only pub you will find on Oxford Street.

The original monopoly board price was £300, but what is the average house price on Oxford Street today?

A - £2,500,000

B - £3,000,000

C - £3,500,000

Bond Street

Bond Street is in the West End of London and links Oxford Street to Piccadilly and has been a popular retail destination since the 18th century in particular for high fashion and luxury and expensive goods. According to Westminster City Council Bond Street has the highest density of haute couture stores anywhere in the world and in terms of real estate is one of the most expensive and sought after streets in Europe.

Bonus fact: Bond Street does not actually exist. Although commonly referred to as Bond Street the term actually refers to two streets Old Bond Street and New Bond Street

The original monopoly board price was £320, but what is the average house price on Bond Street today?

A - £5,750,000

B - £6,000,000

C - £6,250,000

Park Lane

Park Lane is one of the roads which forms part of the London Inner Ring Road and runs from Marble Arch in the north to Hyde Park Corner in the south. Despite it being a very traffic-laden road it still remains as desirable and sought after location as it was when the UK version of monopoly was originally released in the 1930s.

Bonus fact: In 1988 the Monopoly World Championships were held in the Park Lane Hotel

The original monopoly board price was £350, but what is the average house price on Park Lane today?

A - £6,500,000

B - £7,000,000

C - £7,500,000

Mayfair

Mayfair is not actually a street in London, rather it is an affluent area in the West End of London. It was largely a rural area until the mid 18th century and it became well known for its 'May Fair' which took place between 1686 to 1764 from which it took its name. Mayfair was developed into an 'upper class' area after it was acquired (through marriage) by the Duke of Westminster in the 18th century and has remained an upper-class high-end expensive area ever since.

Bonus fact: The department store Debenhams became one of the first companies in Britain to have a dedicated business telephone number, Mayfair 1, in 1903

The original monopoly board price was £400, but what is the average house price on Mayfair today?

A - £6,000,000

B - £7,000,000

C - £8,000,000

St Pancras

The UK monopoly has four railway stations, each of which cost £200 in the original game. Whilst there is not really a market for train stations in the same way as there is for houses, just for fun we thought we'd compare the monopoly cost to the refurbishment cost of St Pancras in 2007

Bonus fact: The Meeting Place sculpture at St Pancras situated under the station clock is 29.5 feet high (9m) and weighs 20 tonnes.

The original monopoly board price was £200, but what was the cost of St Pancras's 2007 renovation?

A - £1,000,000,000

B - £2,000,000,000

C - £3,000,000,000

Waterworks

Once again the market for waterworks in a thin one, but we do know the estimated cost of the London Super Sewer. The Thames Tideway Tunnel will run under the tidal section of the River Thames. Work started on the tunnel in 2016 and is due to finish in 2025

Bonus fact: The Thames Tideway tunnel will be 16 miles (25km) long

On the original UK monopoly board, the waterworks cost £150, but how much will the Thames Tideway Tunnel cost?

A - £4,000,000,000

B - £6,000,000,000

C - £8,000,000,000

Electricity Company

We had to think hard about this one as Battersea Power Station is not currently for sale as a power station, ironically it is being turned into houses...

However, Hinkley C power station should provide energy to 6 million homes and London has around 9 million residents so is the closest approximation we could find of power stations currently under construction in the UK

Bonus fact:  The electricity generated Hinkley C's two reactors will offset 9 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions a year over its 60-year lifespan

On the original UK monopoly board, the electricity company cost £150, but how much will Hinkley C cost?

A - £14,000,000,000

B - £18,000,000,000

C - £22,000,000,000

Want to know how much your house is worth?

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Quiz answers

To see the answers to the quiz click here

Anthony Codling
CEO, Twindig

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